(CUHK 2008–09 academic year, semesters 1 & 2)

Course Description

This 2-credit general education course provides an introduction to Confucianism, Mohism, Daoism, and Buddhism aimed at enhancing students’ understanding of the roots of Chinese values and culture. The course will be taught in English and reading assignments will be in English. However, students who read Chinese are encouraged to read the primary sources in Chinese. A complete set of course readings in Chinese will be distributed.

Course enrollment is limited to 50. Attendance is required and class participation is encouraged. As part of the "participation" component of the course, a brief writing assignment will be given at every class meeting.

Assessment

Three short homework assignments (40%); final examination (40%); attendance and participation (20%).

Lecture Schedule

1. Introduction: Origins and General Features of Chinese Thought (5/1/09, 12/1/09)

Core reading: “Announcement to the Prince of Kang,” The Announcement of the Duke of Shao” (handouts).

Further reading: De Bary and Bloom, Sources, pp. 3–40; Graham, Disputers, pp. 1–8.

2. Confucius and the Analects (19/1/09, 2/2/09)

Core reading: Riegel, “Confucius”; Ivanhoe and Van Norden, Readings, pp. 3–50.

Further reading: Richey, “Confucius”; Wong, “Chinese Ethics,” sections 22.4; Graham, Disputers, pp. 9–33.

3. Mencius and Xunzi (9/2, 16/2, 23/2)

Core reading: Shun, “Mencius”; Robins, “Xunzi”; Ivanhoe and Van Norden, Readings, pp. 113–53, 248–91.

Further reading: Wong, “Chinese Ethics,” sections 2.5–2.6; Ivanhoe, Confucian Moral Self-Cultivation, ch. 2–3; Richey, “Mencius”; Elstein, “Xunzi.”

4. Mohism (2/3, 9/3)

Core reading: Fraser, “Mohism”; Ivanhoe and Van Norden, Readings, pp. 57–107.

Further reading: Loy, “Mozi”; Graham, Disputers of the Tao, pp. 33–51, 267–85.

5. Daoism (16/3, 23/3, 30/3)

Core reading: Hansen, “Taoism”: Chan, Laozi”; Wong, “Chinese Ethics,” sect. 4; Ivanhoe and Van Norden, Readings, pp. 159–243.

Further reading: Coutinho, “Zhuangzi; Graham, Disputers, 170–235.

6. Buddhism (6/4)

Core reading: Wong, “Chinese Ethics,” sect. 6; De Bary and Bloom, Sources, pp. 415–436, 491–517.

Further reading: Lusthaus, Buddhist Philosophy, Chinese.”

References and Further Reading

Chan, Alan. “Laozi.” Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, 2007.

Coutinho, Steve. “Zhuangzi.” Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy, 2008.

Cua, A. S., ed. Encyclopedia of Chinese Philosophy (Routledge, 2003).

de Bary, Wm. T., and Irene Bloom, eds., Sources of Chinese Tradition, Vol. I, 2nd ed. (Columbia, 1999).

Elstein, David. “Xunzi.” Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy, 2004.

Feng Youlan (Fung Yu-lan), A Short History of Chinese Philosophy (Free Press, 1966).

Fraser, Chris. “Mohism.” Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, 2007.

Hansen, Chad, A Daoist Theory of Chinese Thought (Oxford, 1992).

Hansen, Chad. “Taoism.” Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, 2007.

Graham, A. C., Disputers of the Tao (Open Court, 1989).

Ivanhoe, P. J., Confucian Moral Self-Cultivation, 2nd ed. (Hackett, 2000).

Ivanhoe, P. J., and Bryan Van Norden, eds., Readings in Classical Chinese Philosophy (old edition, Seven Bridges, 2001; new edition, Hackett Publishing Company, 2005. ISBN 0-87220-703-X).

Loy, Hui-chieh. “Mozi.” Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy, 2005.

Lusthaus, Dan. “Buddhist Philosophy, Chinese.” Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy, 1998.

Munro, Donald, The Concept of Man in Early China (Stanford, 1969; reprint Center for Chinese Studies, University of Michigan, 2001).

Richey, Jeffrey. "Confucius." Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy, 2006.

Richey, Jeffrey. “Mencius.” Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy, 2005.

Riegel, Jeffrey. “Confucius.” Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, 2006.

Robins, Dan. “Xunzi.” Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, 2007.

Shun, Kwong-Loi. “Mencius.” Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, 2004.

Wong, David. “Chinese Ethics.” Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, 2008.